Preventatives and Treatments for the Most Common Cancers in Men

October 16, 2019

Cancer does not discriminate. Whether these malignancies are caused by genetics, environmental exposure or simply bad luck, the road to recovery is harrowing and unfortunately, not always guaranteed. Men are particularly susceptible to a handful of cancers that carry a history of high death tolls. Today’s oncologists are working to change that as they break ground on new treatments and immunotherapies that surpass the success of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. “What’s being developed are treatments that target certain molecular structures either in or on the cancer cell,” says Dr. Thomas Alberico of Virginia Oncology Associates. “Where before we were seeing response rates in the five to 10 percent range with standard chemotherapy, now we’re seeing response rates in the 40, 50 and 60 percent range [with new therapies].”

Read More Categories: Cancer Screening, Cancer Prevention, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colon & Rectal Cancer

Tobacco After Cancer

May 20, 2019

You probably know tobacco use is bad for your health. In fact, over-the-counter tobacco products are legally required to include one of the following warning labels reminding the public of tobacco’s dangers, especially the dangers of cancer.

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Lung Cancer, Cancer Survivorship, Survivorship and Nutrition

Skin Cancer Prevention Tips: Common Sunscreen Mistakes

April 23, 2019

Keeping your skin healthy and damage-free is important for reducing your risk of developing melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. One of the best ways to do that is to prevent sun damage from occurring by using sunscreen. However, many people don't apply sunscreen properly, or they’re making other common mistakes when using sunscreen which is increasing their risks of developing skin cancer.

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer

Skin Cancer Prevention Tips: How to Read a Sunscreen Label

September 27, 2018

The state of Virginia has so much to offer. From its beaches to its mountains, as well as its “Goldilocks Climate” (not too hot; not too cold), there are so many reasons and opportunities to get outside. With that said, as you enjoy those outdoor activities, it’s important to keep your skin protected from the harmful rays of the sun.

Exposure to ultraviolet light is the primary cause of skin cancers and premature aging. Both of these can be largely avoided by protecting the skin from ultraviolet rays. If you’re going to be outdoors enjoying any of the 5 distinct climate regions Virginia has to offer, one of the best things you can do to protect your skin is to wear sunscreen. Wearing protective clothing and avoiding the sun at the hottest times of the day (10 am - 4 pm) can also reduce the risk of developing skin cancer.

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer

What Does SPF Mean?

August 8, 2018

Even though summer is halfway over, August is Summer Sun Safety Month. Which means there is still time to be conscious about practicing sun safety. One major way you can do this is by slathering on some sunscreen.

Choosing a sunscreen can be a daunting task. With so many combinations of numbers and specializations (SPF what?), it’s no wonder a lot of people skip wearing sunscreen altogether. To clear up some of the confusion, let’s talk more about what SPF is as well as its importance when using the right sunscreen for your skin.

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer, Cancer Risk

How to Use the UV Index to Know When to Stay Inside

July 16, 2018

For most people, summer fun includes summer sun. As you soak up those warm rays, however, keep in mind that prolonged exposure to the ultraviolet radiation of the sun can be harmful to your skin. Since July is known as UV Safety Month, let’s take a moment to learn more about sun exposure, including how much is safe, when you should avoid it, and how it can play a role in the development of skin cancer.

Understanding the UV Index

Did you know that the risk of UV damage to your eyes and skin is dependent upon where you live? In the United States, the strength of UV radiation is measured by the UV Index, which provides a forecast of the expected risk of overexposure to UV radiation from the sun based on geographical location.

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer, Cancer Risk

Is Your Weight Affecting Your Risk of Developing Cancer?

June 6, 2018

It’s no secret that being carrying excess pounds can lead to serious health consequences–but did you know that it can also raise your risk for certain types of cancer? National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that in 2011–2014, nearly 70% of U.S. adults aged 20 years or older were overweight or obese.

Research shows that higher amounts of body fat can increase the risk for several types of cancer, including liver cancer, kidney cancer, colon cancer, rectal cancer, endometrial cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, thyroid cancer, cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer (in women past menopause). Obesity also increases the risk for developing advanced prostate cancer, which is the most dangerous stage of the disease. 

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk

4 Things That Can Make Your Skin Sensitive to the Sun

May 22, 2018

Have you ever gotten a sunburn even after taking all the necessary precautions, such as slathering on sunscreen or wearing a hat? If so, you’re well aware that it’s not just painful, but frustrating as well.

It may be shocking to learn that certain medications, foods, skin care products, and other agents can actually increase your skin’s sensitivity to the sun’s harmful rays (photosensitivity). While many of these “sunburn boosters” aren’t considered harmful in and of themselves, it is important to use them with caution on days you know your skin will be exposed to the sun.   

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Skin Cancer

What Does the Great American Smokeout Have to Do with Lung Cancer Risk?

November 13, 2017

What is the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout? It's an annual event, held the third Thursday of every November, a date on which smokers nationwide are asked to give up smoking. Quitting for just one day helps you take action toward a healthier life, and reduce your lung cancer risk.

Each year, the Great American Smokeout calls attention to the deaths, lung cancer diagnosis and other chronic diseases that smoking causes, and how to prevent them. As a result of this event, there have been actions taken towards reducing the health impacts that smoking can have on smokers and non-smokers including:

Read More Categories: Cancer Prevention, Lung Cancer

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