What Happens After Ovarian Cancer?

November 12, 2018

I’m done with Ovarian Cancer Treatment, now what? 

It’s understandable that women who have recently gone through treatment for ovarian cancer want the answer to this question. While the thought of remission can bring a sense of relief, there are also questions and concerns about what it means to be an ovarian cancer survivor--What lifestyle changes will I have to make? Will there be fertility challenges? What are the chances my cancer will come back?

If you have recently finished ovarian cancer treatment it is important to remember to give yourself time to adjust to any physical and emotional changes you are going through. Eventually, ovarian cancer survivors re-establish a daily routine--and you will too, at your own pace.

Read More Categories: Gynecologic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Cancer Survivorship

Can I Donate My Organs After Cancer?

October 31, 2018

As a cancer survivor, it’s probably safe to assume that during your journey you’ve developed a true appreciation of life. You know firsthand what it feels like to receive a serious diagnosis, the uncertainties of living with cancer, and the feelings of joy, relief, and gratitude when you beat it. Thanks to your unique life experiences, you may feel compelled to sign up as an organ donor so you can give the gift of life to someone else.

Read More Categories: Survivorship and Helping Others

Alcohol After Cancer?

October 26, 2018

As a cancer survivor, your goal is probably to resume your familiar lifestyle as quickly as possible. You may be feeling more like your old self again with a growing appetite and the ability to enjoy the flavors in food once again. If you also enjoyed an alcoholic beverage before cancer, you may be wondering if that’s acceptable after cancer treatment. You may be right to think twice about drinking alcohol after cancer.

Read More Categories: Survivorship and Nutrition

HPV and Cervical Cancer: What’s the Connection?

October 19, 2018

 When it comes to cervical cancer, nearly all cases are caused by exposure to the human papillomavirus, or HPV. Thankfully, cervical cancer is almost always preventable. Understanding more about HPV and cervical health in general can greatly help in the prevention of this kind of cancer. Here’s some important information every woman should know.

HPV: The Root Cause of Cervical Cancer 

Cervical cancer is a disease that forms in the tissues of a woman’s cervix. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus (womb) that connects to the vagina (birth canal). According to the National Cervical Cancer Coalition, human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted disease (STD), is found in about 99% of cervical cancers.

Read More Categories: Cervical Cancer

Five Ways to Thank Your Cancer Caregivers

October 10, 2018

Having cancer is emotionally and physically draining. Looking back on your journey, you’ll probably agree that the unwavering support of your cancer caregivers played a huge role in your recovery. Maybe you had friends and family members who seemed to instinctively know what you needed and stepped up to help without being asked? From giving you rides to and from your appointments, making you meals, doing your laundry, taking care of your yard, helping with your children and pets, and simply providing a shoulder to cry on or a listening ear, your cancer caregivers were an unofficial yet important part of your care team. Thanks to their help, you didn’t have to “sweat the small stuff” and were able to focus on your recovery.

Read More Categories: Survivorship and Family

Skin Cancer Prevention Tips: How to Read a Sunscreen Label

September 27, 2018

The state of Virginia has so much to offer. From its beaches to its mountains, as well as its “Goldilocks Climate” (not too hot; not too cold), there are so many reasons and opportunities to get outside. With that said, as you enjoy those outdoor activities, it’s important to keep your skin protected from the harmful rays of the sun.

Exposure to ultraviolet light is the primary cause of skin cancers and premature aging. Both of these can be largely avoided by protecting the skin from ultraviolet rays. If you’re going to be outdoors enjoying any of the 5 distinct climate regions Virginia has to offer, one of the best things you can do to protect your skin is to wear sunscreen. Wearing protective clothing and avoiding the sun at the hottest times of the day (10 am - 4 pm) can also reduce the risk of developing skin cancer.

Read More Categories: Skin Cancer, Cancer Prevention

Cancer Research is Advancing Breast Cancer Treatment Options

September 25, 2018

By David Z. Chang, MD,PhD, FACP

Recent developments in breast cancer treatment have continued to fuel our movement toward tailored treatment for each individual patient.

Two of the newest and most promising fronts are targeted therapy and immunotherapy. Both aim to more effectively kill cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue, thereby causing fewer debilitating side effects as compared to traditional chemotherapy.

Read More Categories: Breast Cancer, Cancer Research, Healthcare Providers

What Does SPF Mean?

August 8, 2018

Even though summer is halfway over, August is Summer Sun Safety Month. Which means there is still time to be conscious about practicing sun safety. One major way you can do this is by slathering on some sunscreen.

Choosing a sunscreen can be a daunting task. With so many combinations of numbers and specializations (SPF what?), it’s no wonder a lot of people skip wearing sunscreen altogether. To clear up some of the confusion, let’s talk more about what SPF is as well as its importance when using the right sunscreen for your skin.

Read More Categories: Skin Cancer, Cancer Risk, Cancer Prevention

How to Use the UV Index to Know When to Stay Inside

July 16, 2018

For most people, summer fun includes summer sun. As you soak up those warm rays, however, keep in mind that prolonged exposure to the ultraviolet radiation of the sun can be harmful to your skin. Since July is known as UV Safety Month, let’s take a moment to learn more about sun exposure, including how much is safe, when you should avoid it, and how it can play a role in the development of skin cancer.

Read More Categories: Cancer Risk, Skin Cancer, Cancer Prevention

Is Your Weight Affecting Your Risk of Developing Cancer?

June 6, 2018

It’s no secret that being carrying excess pounds can lead to serious health consequences–but did you know that it can also raise your risk for certain types of cancer? National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) showed that in 2011–2014, nearly 70% of U.S. adults aged 20 years or older were overweight or obese.

Research shows that higher amounts of body fat can increase the risk for several types of cancer, including liver cancer, kidney cancer, colon cancer, rectal cancer, endometrial cancer, esophageal cancer, pancreatic cancer, gallbladder cancer, thyroid cancer, cervical cancer, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer (in women past menopause). Obesity also increases the risk for developing advanced prostate cancer, which is the most dangerous stage of the disease. 

Read More Categories: Cancer Risk

1 2 3